6/28/2018

we just cancelled our Netflix subscription.


Enough is freaking enough.

Before today, I had already gone to Sean saying, do you think it's time we get rid of it? It's barely a blip on our budget, at $11 per month. And yes, we'll each occasionally binge watch shows on it. The kids have their favorites on it. Sure sure sure. But do we need it?

A while back, also, I read an article of the new lineup of Netflix-produced programming coming to my TV. No thank you.

And then today, I saw this headline and Drudge: "Netflix Under Fire for Suspected Child Pornography Scenes."



I clicked. I read a pretty graphic account of the scenes.

And I regret it. Why wasn't the title alone enough to make me take action? But no, I read about the sexual abuse of the children, and now that is something I cannot un-read. I'm not going to link to it here. The headline says what needs to be said. Here's a tamer account, for what it's worth.

We're canceling our subscription. I'm ashamed to say I've allowed--no, paid--to have that kind of material available on my family's television screen for far too long. That "movie," if it can be called that, was mere clicks away from my children. That "movie," which filmed the sexual abuse of two innocent, small children, was completely accessible to my family. Free of additional charge.

I'm horrified. I'm embarrassed that I casually allowed a streaming service into my home in the name of "entertainment." 

The eminently quotable Matt Walsh is uncomfortably right on this, as he is on so many issues regarding our lost compass of cultural morality: if that TV show (or TV streaming service) doesn't bring you closer to God, don't watch it. Get rid of it.

This is a bridge I've tried to cross before. When Target's executives decided to let men use women's bathrooms, because #tolerance or something, I said then, too, that enough was freaking enough. And in the years since, I confess to crossing the threshold of my local store only handful of times. It wasn't and hasn't been a perfect boycott, but I've made an effort to keep that business out of my life.

I've read blog posts on boycotts, on how people don't like them. They don't "work." They don't make a dent. You'd have to boycott every company you use on a daily basis, they say, to be consistent. You'd have to throw out the phone you used to read Drudge. You'd have to toss the very computer on which you're typing this blog post. You'd have to forge your way in a world without Walmart, Amazon, Gap or Apple.

Yes. That's right. To be absolutely, perfectly consistent, yes, I would.

However, I've taken up a little motto: do not let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

I cannot be perfect. I'm a flawed mother who regularly loses her ever-loving bleep and barely makes it to confession, ever. I'm a hypocrite, a liar, and a self-righteous blogger. Yep.

However, I cannot produce my own smart phone. But I can produce or find wholesome entertainment for my kids. I can't make my own computer or sew my own clothes, but I can shop local thrift stores instead of buying everything new. I can barely make my own coffee, since I've also tried to swear off of Starbucks, which is one of the few major corporate sponsors of abortion.

I can start small, and I can try and get better. I can stop paying a company that is purely superfluous to my life and is sponsoring child porn.

I can cancel my Netflix subscription.

2 comments:

  1. So awful! Thank you for posting this. When I'm watching something and a kid cusses or says something def. not age appropriate my heart hurts so much that their innocence was taken away in the name of acting. And what those headlines propose is just unthinkable!!
    We stopped using target and Starbucks for a few different reasons and I don't care that we're not even a blip to them- I feel better that we're not supporting them, especially at times when it's inconvenient for us.

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    1. Definitely--it's always been more about *my* conscience then *their* bottom line. And yes, the loss of innocence! I have children that are the ages of those in the Netflix film noted above. Makes me ill.

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